Uplifting Blog

Top 10 Blog Posts

Sorry, we couldn't find any posts. Please try a different search.

Recent Blog Posts

The Leader’s Role in Service Education

Service education is only effective when learners take new actions to create more value for customers and colleagues.

As a leader, you have a personal responsibility to ensure that new learning is ‘put to work’ on a daily basis.

Here are five action steps to make this happen:

The manager’s role in service education

Managers are the essential link between service education programs and the results your organization wants to achieve.

As a manager, it is your responsibility to ensure educational courses create value for your team members, and your team members create even more value for your customers and each other.

These five action steps can help you make this happen:

The Value of Customer Complaints: Ten Reasons Why Complaints are a Good Thing (Part One)

When things go wrong, your customers will complain. Surprisingly, this can be good for you and constructive for your organization.

Here are 10 ways customer complaints can benefit you and your organization.

10 Reasons Why Customer Complaints Are Good News (Part Two)

6. Fuel for an Uplifting Service Culture

• Complaints can work as a trigger for taking new action and catalyzing positive change.

• Sharing customer complaints throughout the organization educates everyone to understand what your customers experience, expect and insist upon receiving.

• Complaints prevent complacency. New problems keep humility high and teammates on their toes.

How to craft a unique and powerful service vision

Your service vision should be unique and powerful. Customers should hear it and say, “Yes! This is who you are.” Employees should read it and say, “Yes! This is who we want to be.”

Organizations often have written statements declaring their commitment to superior service. While the intentions are good, many of these statements are not distinctive, motivating or clear.

Here are 3 guidelines you should consider when crafting your service vision:

13 Questions Before You Change Your Company or Service Culture

When thinking about improving your company’s service culture, it’s also a good idea to take a look at your overarching company culture.

Do you know what your company culture is like? Is it defined?

Company culture can evolve over a long time, through the actions of its founding members and the people they hire. If there is not a concerted effort to develop a company’s culture at its outset, it will be naturally and unconsciously formed over time.

14 questions to ask when building a service culture

1. Is our leadership team in agreement on key business goals and priorities? Do they understand the importance of a strong service culture to achieve these goals?

2. Do our service training programs teach the same fundamental principles to the entire organization? Are these principles being applied to create measurable value for our customers?

3. Does our organization share a common language from top to bottom and across departments when talking about service? Do we use this same language to talk about external service to customers and internal service to colleagues?

4. Do all our employees and partners clearly understand our service vision and act to make it real every day?

Four Capacities a Leader Needs to Build a Service Culture

An excellent blog post from Tony Schwartz on Harvard Business Review encouraged us to write about successful leaders in organizations that are building a service culture.

Leaders must inspire action. Building a service culture is a strategic, long-term initiative that requires sustained focus and commitment. We apply Tony’s list of four “great capacities” of leadership to describe the actions service leaders must take to achieve great results.

Focusing with service improvement focus groups

Focus groups can be a gold-mine of valuable service improvement ideas, insights and suggestions. Here are some questions and tips to help you create engaging and valuable conversations.

Does your organizational structure work?

The right organizational structure facilitates superior service, sharing of views, rapid decisions, flexible execution and quick responses to unexpected opportunities or problems.

‘Chain of command’ may be good for a marching army, but it has real limitations for creating new service value in a dynamic global market. Customer expectations can change in a minute. How fast can your company respond?

Join the community and receive free resources, ideas, and invitations.

Scroll to Top

Welcome to the Worldwide Uplifting Community!

Here’s what’s next…

Check your email for the welcome we just sent – and reply to let us know you received it!

We’ve included some useful resources 
for you to explore…

…and we’ll be in touch to share more ideas 
and invitations for you.

Join the Worldwide Uplifting Community

We’ll send you free resources, education, and ideas for creating positive change in the world.

Welcome to the Worldwide Uplifting Community!

Here’s what’s next…

Check your email for the welcome we just sent – and reply to let us know you received it!

We’ve included some useful resources 
for you to explore…

…and we’ll be in touch to share more ideas 
and invitations for you.